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Brennus 4.0 - N°8 - The CDEC newsletter

 
 

HIGH INTENSITY AND HIGH TECHNOLOGY

Technology has always been put at the service of any type of confrontation by the various belligerents, whether it be a hope of breaking up, a desire to bypass or a desire to level capacities. After the asymmetrical or asymmetrical theorization of the conflicts that have marked the last decades, the return of a threat that can also manifest itself in a more conventional way has led the Army to revisit the notion of high intensity, around the following definition: "sustained confrontation between masses of aggressive maneuvers contesting each other to the depths and in different environments all the fields of conflict (physical and immaterial) and whose objective is to defeat the power of the adversary".

The option of such a scenario could falsely remind the oldest among us of many things: global confrontation in a context where the notion of "superiority of environments", particularly in the air, was a decoy, while the threat of an attack in depth was a permanent fear. However, in a never-ending race, the technological developments referred to in the title have changed the fields of conflict in the five environments chosen (land, sea, air, cyber and space), adding a layer of complexity by opening up new possibilities, both in the intangible fields (dizzying possibilities in the cyber domain, ever-increasing influence of social networks, real "opinion makers", the notion of the "battle of the data", etc.) and in the material fields (continuous increase in ranges, control of spatial capacities, increased precision and lethality, etc.). However, in this field we must strike the right technological balance in order to ensure our operational superiority and avoid any stalling, without the costs of acquisition and maintenance in operational condition being too high.

In the face of these challenges, the integration of effects and the combination of possibilities undoubtedly represent a new stage in the art of warfare. It is therefore a question of capitalising on old know-how, acquired at the time through rigorous training, while innovating on a daily basis, thanks in particular to the possibilities offered by the continuous increase in data flows, robotic systems, semi-autonomous platforms and artificial intelligence. It is also a question of preparing ourselves psychologically to fight there, but also here, as the individualisation of the threat has continued to progress, with the result that the national territory, our fellow citizens and our infrastructures are unfortunately no longer totally safe.

All these issues are clearly mentioned in CEMAT's new strategic vision, which is broken down into 12 major projects. In particular, they will result in a new Concept of Use for the Land Forces, a project for which the CDEC is responsible, and which cannot be developed without collective reflection. More than ever, it is therefore a question of relaunching a multidisciplinary reflection that the CDEC proposes to lead through the Terre think tank, a forum for military-earth thinking. As such, this new issue of your Brennus now integrates, in addition to the historical and thematic reflections, a broader intellectual watch, intended to share points of view and feed the debates.

Enjoy reading ... and don't hesitate to take up the pen or the keyboard in your turn!
Major General Michel Delion, Director of the Centre for Doctrine and Command Education

1 Definition of high-intensity conflict used by the Army.
 
 
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Brennus 4.0 - N°8 - The CDEC newsletter

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